In a Raft of New Books, Motherhood From (Almost) Every Angle

And then there is Jacqueline Rose’s own new book, “Mothers: An Essay on Love and Cruelty,” a sort of Rosetta Stone for the moment that examines the particular mix of fascination and dread that mothers engender. Photo Jacqueline Rose Credit Jonathan Ring Rose is a calm and stylish writer whose rangy essays in the London Review of Books on violence and identity, #MeToo, the trial of Oscar Pistorius and other subjects have become indispensable reading during the current reckoning around power and sexuality. She has written at length about Sylvia…

Kate Riordan celebrates the release of The Stranger with an exclusive short story | Books | Entertainment

GETTY Kate Riordan writes The Treat, an exclusive short story for the Express In one candle-lit corner sat a couple in their late fifties. They were well-preservedbbut no longer turned heads when they went out for dinner. Their starters arrived, brought by a girl with a bottom too wide for her tight black trousers. He had ordered the soup, which came with a lopsided swirl of cream. She had wanted to save her appetite for the desserts so had gone for the ham and melon. Beneath her fork, the balled…

In This Space Race, Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk Are Competing to Take You There

In the class that I teach on the history of the digital revolution, the students discuss whether innovation is driven more by big government projects or by nimble entrepreneurs. The answer, of course, is that it usually involves a symbiotic mix, like the semiconductor industry, which arose out of the Pentagon and NASA’s need to put guidance systems in the nose cones of rockets. Vannevar Bush was the dean of engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a co-founder of Raytheon, and oversaw the government science programs that resulted in…

The Walls That Hillary Clinton Created

It seems clear from Chozick’s account that Clinton thought of her traveling press corps as more buzzard than human (although she did write Chozick a note when her grandmother died). Bill Clinton also had troubles with the press, but at least he would say hello at events or tell a long-winded story. Even Trump, who spent the campaign railing against the “fake news” media, seemed to intuit that a cordial relationship with reporters was essential to managing his public image. Trump once called Chozick out of the blue to provide…

When the Aftermath of a Shooting Is as Devastating as the Crime

Maggie’s supervisor informs her that his staff is now expected not only to teach but to function as something between a trained psychologist and the thought police, sniffing out evidence before there is any crime. “Any material that alludes, directly or indirectly, to feelings of sadness, anxiety, anger, violence, hopelessness,” he tells Maggie, will warrant an official alert. But that’s every student, every paper, Maggie reminds her boss. Moreover, the “personal experience” essays that are central to English composition classes depend on the mining of painful memories and vulnerabilities. Maggie…

Nancy Has Been in the Comics Since 1933. Now She Uses Snapchat.

On April 16, the strip seemingly responded to critics with a cartoonist’s note that read, “Any questionable art from now on is because Nancy and Sluggo are using a Snapchat filter.” Ms. Jaimes works about a month in advance, but said she was anticipating criticism when she drew it. “That’s the way the internet is,” she wrote. But with controversy comes attention. John Glynn, the president and editorial director of Andrews McMeel Syndication, which distributes Nancy, has seen a spike in the strip’s traffic on gocomics.com. “It used to average…

From Missoni, a Stylish Cookbook

Photo The author is the son of Angela Missoni, the fashion house’s creative director. Credit Alessandra Montalto/The New York Times Will your Mother’s Day budget allow for a gift from Missoni, the colorful Italian fashion house? Perhaps if Mom would appreciate a cookbook it will. “The Missoni Family Cookbook” by Francesco Maccapani Missoni, the son of Angela Missoni, the company’s creative director, has just been published. It’s every bit as vibrant as the style for which the 65-year-old house is known. But the operative term is “family.” In assembling the…

Rachel Kushner’s ‘The Mars Room’ Offers Big Ideas in Close Quarters

“The Mars Room” is the follow-up to Kushner’s “The Flamethrowers” (2013), one of this decade’s indelible novels. That novel has a sense of escape, of IMAX Western vistas. Its protagonist, Reno, is a young woman who races a Valera motorcycle on the Bonneville Salt Flats. Photo Rachel Kushner Credit Chloe Aftel “The Mars Room,” on the other hand, is all about constriction. Like Alfred Hitchcock in many of his best films, Kushner works here in close quarters. This novel shifts from the strip club to a more claustrophobic venue: a…

Winds of Winter: Lady Stoneheart’s role in Game of Thrones book 6? | Books | Entertainment

Last year the A Song of Ice and Fire author spoke with Chinese Esquire about his next Game of Thrones book. He may still be writing The Winds of Winter, but Martin did tease a big role for Lady Stoneheart. He said: “After Catelyn’s resurrection, it was Lady Stoneheart who became a vengeful and merciless killer. “In the sixth book, I still continue to write her. She is an important part of the entire book.” But what exactly will that role be for the undead Catelyn Stark? Fans on the…

Who Bought Sylvia Plath’s Stuff?

For the many feminist critics who have excoriated Ted Hughes’s treatment of his first wife, Sylvia Plath, there was poetic justice of a sort in the auction of the poets’ belongings by their daughter, Frieda Hughes, at Bonhams in London in March. Ms. Plath’s lots, which included clothes, jewelry and childhood drawings, outsold Mr. Hughes’s mostly literary remnants (which is to say, books) twice over and then some, earning $551,862. The pleated green tartan kilt Ms. Plath wore as a Smith College undergraduate, with blue-lettered name tape affixed to the…