Review: Royal Danes Deliver Fresh Shots of Bournonville

BECKET, Mass. — Some paradoxical time capsule hovers around or within the Royal Danish Ballet. Although the choreographer August Bournonville (1805-79) didn’t create the company, he bequeathed it such a wealth of touchingly human choreography that it remains his. The Royal Danes, as they’re known, also perform other ballets, like “Giselle” and new creations. These vary in excellence: In 2011 it brought three modern horrors to New York before winding up with Bournonville, where suddenly the world looked right again. This week, they’re performing repertory by Bournonville and others here…

The Costumes in Modern Dance’s Attic

Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn’s touring trunks are packed with costumes and accessories that filled out their exotic visions. The headdress from Ruth St. Denis’s 1919 Chinese-inspired “Kuan Yin,” with buttons, feathers and artificial pearls. CreditDavid Dashiell The modern dance tree has abundant roots, and two of its thickest and oldest belong to Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn. Their Denishawn company and school in Los Angeles, which lasted from 1914 to ’29, toured the world with a new spirit of dance — barefoot and weighted, exotic and spiritual.…

At River to River Festival, Dancing Amid the Mundane and Majestic

Events at the River to River Festival are like advertisements for the charms of Lower Manhattan. They tend to take place at historical sites you might otherwise neglect, or outside, between tall buildings and the water, refreshed by sea breezes. Even as the merits of the works vary, the settings are consistently rewarding. Strange, then, for people wishing to see Cori Olinghouse’s “Grandma,” one of three dance works in the first weekend of this year’s 10-day festival, to be directed to a nondescript office building on Maiden Lane. Strange to…

4 Buzzy ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Debuts, 1 Fainthearted Production

Balletomanes care about dancers more than choreography — and American Ballet Theater’s annual season at the Metropolitan Opera House is geared for balletomania. Most productions are given a weeklong block of performances, with different casts at each one. Aisles in the theater are often animated, with keen debates about whether Friday’s cast could ever be as good as Tuesday’s. This week, a run of Kenneth MacMillan’s staging of “Romeo and Juliet” is representative: There has been chatter about two new Juliets, one new Romeo and a new Mercutio. Ballets, however,…

For Pride Week at the Joyce Theater, a Painful Look Back

The Joyce Theater is an Art Deco, neon landmark in the heart of Chelsea, long one of New York’s gay enclaves. Formerly a movie house (it opened in 1941), the Joyce was reborn as a dance theater in 1982, shortly after death moved into the neighborhood in the form of AIDS. In the years that followed, the Joyce presented both performances and memorials for artists lost to the disease. Brian Fisher had just moved to the city to attend New York University when the Joyce became a dance theater. One…

8 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend

NATIONAL DANCE INSTITUTE at N.Y.U. Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (June 16, 5 p.m.; June 17, 2 and 5 p.m.; June 18, 6:30 p.m.). The former New York City Ballet principal Jacques d’Amboise — irrepressible at 83 — formed this arts education organization in 1976. For its “2018 Event of the Year: At the River’s Edge,” directed by Kelly Buwalda, more than 200 dancers from New York City public schools will perform a work inspired, aptly, by the power of rivers, including the cultures, creatures and cities that exist…

Review: Alvin Ailey Returns to Lincoln Center With a Tribute to Women

The notion that female choreographers are underrepresented at major dance companies has hit the mainstream, so much so that just about any program with the word “women” in its title is starting to feel more than merely unimaginative: It has an air of pandering. On Wednesday night, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater continued the trend by opening its season at the David H. Koch Theater with “Celebrate Women,” featuring works by Jessica Lang, Judith Jamison and Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, and concluding with “Revelations,” Alvin Ailey’s 1960 masterpiece and the…

A Corps Dancer Leaps Into His Romeo Debut

What are you experiencing, not just physically but mentally? Physically, it is demanding, because it’s a full-length ballet, and Romeo is on the stage for the majority of the ballet with lots of partnering. Mentally, I feel preoccupied. I spend every spare moment thinking about it and going over it in my head. Your early training included studying with Denys Ganio in Rome. Some of the most memorable moments from “First Position” happen with you and Denys. As you said in the film, “He’s very strict, but he’s not mean-strict.”…

The Poetic Justice of Stella Abrera’s Juliet

About Ms. Copeland’s breakthrough, she added: “It was historic, and there should be a lot of celebration about it. I really admire and respect that woman’s work ethic and her poise. It takes a lot of strength in this ballet world. She represents us so well.” Ms. Abrera still faces challenges. Like Ms. Copeland, who is 35, she contends with an older body (that calf still acts up), and is making her debut in parts that most principals have been dancing for years. “I had to actively try to squash…

This Week: Philharmonic Concerts in the Parks, Summer Jam, Alvin Ailey

Film: Nick Offerman in ‘Hearts Beat Loud’ June 8; heartsbeatloudmovie.com. Frank Fisher is an aging Brooklyn hipster, the resistant-to-change kind who oversees bins of vinyl at the dust-collecting Red Hook record store he bought after his wife died, and his dreams of a band along with her. Their daughter, Sam, is the grown-up in the family, a serious student who would rather spend the summer prepping to study pre-med at U.C.L.A. than joining her father in his weekly jam sessions. But eventually Sam relents, and her supple, smoky-edged voice and…