Why It Seems Like Everyone Is Always Angry With You

“If you think they look angry then you may respond angrily,” said Abigail Marsh, the director of the Laboratory on Social and Affective Neuroscience at Georgetown University. What interested Dr. Schermerhorn was whether an even more common issue — conflict between parents — might also take a toll. She tested this by gathering 99 children, ages nine to 11, who lived in households with their two married biological parents. After the children completed a questionnaire with statements such as, “My parents get really mad when they argue,” she tested their…

Trump Administration Pushes Abstinence in Teen Pregnancy Programs

The new rules also move away from a requirement that most organizations receiving federal money choose from a list of approaches that have been shown in at least one rigorous evaluation to be effective at changing some sexual behavior, such as reducing pregnancy rates or rates of sexual activity. Under Obama administration guidelines, organizations awarded most of the grants had to use curriculums that were on an evidence-supported list. Under the new guidelines, they simply have to comply with more general requirements like “support personal attitudes and beliefs that value…

Setting Fires and Restoring an American Landscape

North America was once a loose, sprawling conversation between landscapes. Soft boundaries linked prairie, savanna, shrubland, forest and marsh. During a dry spell, lightning might spark a fire that burned for miles and days on end, relenting only when it hit a lake or river. Remove fire, and this dialogue gets interrupted. Weedy scrub accumulates, stifling the earth. “Ruderal junk — that’s what happens without fire,” said Bill Kleiman, project director at Nachusa Grasslands, a 3,600-acre preserve in Franklin Grove, Ill., operated by the Nature Conservancy. Today, development and fragmentation…

‘Whole Again’: A Vet Maimed by an I.E.D. Receives a Transplanted Penis

“That injury, I felt like it banished me from a relationship,” he said in an interview last week. “Like, that’s it, you’re done, you’re by yourself for the rest of your life. I struggled with even viewing myself as a man for a long time.” But now, four weeks after the surgery, he said, “I feel whole again.” He asked that his name not be published, because of the stigma associated with genital injuries. Except for his immediate family and a few close friends, he has told no one about…

These Ants Explode, but Their Nests Live to See Another Day

Ms. Laciny is a member of an eclectic group of researchers who are united by their fascination with these insects and who describe in the new paper how C. explodens live and spectacularly die. At 6 a.m., the ants come out of their nest and forage for food until about 6 p.m., the researchers found, although it is not exactly clear yet what they eat. A small squad of workers often stands at the entrances of the colony and touches every ant that comes in or out, apparently monitoring the…

What Lies Beneath Jupiter’s Great Red Spot?

Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. Could there be a volcano under the Great Red Spot of Jupiter? A. A volcano is an unlikely explanation for the mysterious red storm observed on the surface of Jupiter since the early 19th century. The planet has been found to be mostly gas, lacking a defined crust to rupture in an Earth-style volcanic eruption that would release hot materials from the interior of the planet. The spot remains a mystery, and it is not even certain that the storm reported by scientists in 1831…

What a Scientist Learned From Studying the ‘Synchronized Swimming of Sea Monkeys’

John Dabiri isn’t an oceanographer. And he’s not a biologist. But for more than a decade, he’s been studying tiny shrimp swimming through water. It hasn’t always been easy. In 2014, he found his research on small crustaceans under the powerful microscope of Tom Coburn, then a Republican senator from Oklahoma who crusaded against government spending during his time in office. In his government “Wastebook” that year, the senator dismissed Dr. Dabiri’s work as the study of “synchronized swimming for sea monkeys.” But Dr. Dabiri, an engineering professor at Stanford…

Can You Miss the Signs of Heart Disease or a Heart Attack?

Photo Rosie O’Donnell at the Tony Awards in 2014. In 2012 she failed to recognize the symptoms of a heart attack and waited a day before seeing her doctor. Credit Sara Krulwich/The New York Times Q. What are symptoms of heart disease? Can you tell if you have heart disease without having tests done? A. The classic warning signs of heart disease and heart attacks are chest pain, often described as a feeling of pressure or a tight band around the chest, and shortness of breath during physical exertion that…

A Brand-New Version of Our Origin Story

Genetics now says: Yes they did, but apparently without enthusiasm or happy outcomes. All modern humans outside Africa, but no modern Africans, carry about 2 percent of Neanderthal genes. That means that, as modern humans expanded from their African origins into the Near East between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago, they met and occasionally had sex with Neanderthals: perhaps mainly when a lonely modern human found few other moderns with whom to mate. Their hybrid descendants then spread around the world, carrying their 2 percent of Neanderthal genes to everywhere…